Page 2 of 3

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 25th, 2009, 8:00 pm
by Mama's Boy
The music played in sandbox is .ogg. For mac I have a program called audacity that exports music files on my computer into almost all formats, including ogg. Then I put them in sandbox/packages/music. That way I can listen to any music I want while I edit my maps. You can choose which music you want to play in a map with the cfg file, or if you have nothing it will just randomize. Of course, if you share this game it would be best to take the music away ;) .

Let's see... for windows users I hear that http://download.cnet.com/Free-CD-Music- ... 03263.html has a download that can convert to ogg.

Good luck,
Jacob

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 11:58 am
by Kevin
... or you could just turn on Windows Media Player, Winamp, or whatever and then start the game. Also this way, you won't waste time compressing into .oggs and you could save several hundered megabytes of disk space depending on the amount of songs you were copying.

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 4:35 pm
by GoBologna120
Kevin wrote:... or you could just turn on Windows Media Player, Winamp, or whatever and then start the game. Also this way, you won't waste time compressing into .oggs and you could save several hundered megabytes of disk space depending on the amount of songs you were copying.


Sure you could save disk space, but...

*clears throat*

LAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAG!!!

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 4:45 pm
by Joe Staff
Yeah, on your machine :lol:

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 6:19 pm
by GoBologna120
Not like I can help that, can I? :x

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 8:17 pm
by Dannyboi
Nah, you cant. But ill figure it out i guess. Im actally working on adding a house on clownfishs map. It's turning out pretty good, but I cant be back on till late sunday evening.

Thanks.
-Danny

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 26th, 2009, 10:23 pm
by Joe Staff
I'm working on preventing lag for my computer, I'm buying a $2400 machine =)

Proc: AMD Phenom X4 955 (Black Edition) Quad-Core (3.2ghz, has been overclocked to 7.1ghz before)
Vid: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295 (1.7GB mem, 896-BIT)
Mobo: ASUS M4A79T Deluxe AM3 DDR3 AMD 790FX CrossFire Chipset w/7.1 Sound (I assure you it's pretty good)
Liquid Cooled
128GB Solid State Drive & 1.5 TB 7200rpm HDD
8GB of DDR3 1600FSB RAM

And they should be shipping it tomorrow or day after ^.^ I can't wait >.<

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 27th, 2009, 12:20 pm
by GoBologna120
I wish I had that kind of money. =(

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 29th, 2009, 1:20 am
by johnno56
Joe,

That is one serious machine! That much grunt would primarily be used for heavy online gaming or heavy duty video editing.

I have been building PC's for many years and can tell you that, no matter how fast the machine, it will eventually slow down. The main reason is the operating system. I have found the simpler the system the faster it flies. I have found that the most stable operating systems have been, DOS, Windows 3.1, Windows XP and Ubuntu Linux. Don't laugh! The old systems rarely failed. (Sorry Mac users, I have had no experience with your OS)

Keep all your drivers up to date. Get yourself a very good to excellent security suite. (maybe a PC diagnostic tool as well.)

If you have the resources to create an image backup of your system, then do so. Make sure that you have everything installed running the way you want. Create the image and store it. Will save a lot of headaches when it comes to rebuilding your software.

I wish a machine like yours was priced like that in Australia. Over the counter (serious) machine are far to expensive here.

By all means, let us know how your machine performs. We are drooling already.

Enjoy.

Regards

J

Re: Music Packs

Posted: June 29th, 2009, 6:46 am
by Obsidian
With the Linux kernel, all you have to do is keep that up to date for current drivers, they're all included in the kernel. :)

As far as a security suite, with a Linux distro, you should look into running the SELinux security module for the Linux kernel. It was developed by the NSA and allows extremely thorough control of the machine, and what users can do on it. Very effective at keeping a machine under your control, especially if it is remotely accessed.


Also, Windows XP? Stable? Somewhat. Secure? Heck no. It's very easy to get into command prompt from a local machine and then do whatever you want in there, unless you spend hours upon hours of installing modifications to the Windows core to lock the entire machine down.